Should vaccines be mandatory to attend public school?

Should vaccinations be mandatory to attend public school?

  • Yes, vaccinations should always be mandatory.

    Votes: 47 79.7%
  • No, vaccinations should never be mandatory.

    Votes: 3 5.1%
  • Special exceptions should be made for religious and medical reasons.

    Votes: 9 15.3%

  • Total voters
    59

D.Va

Literal Princess
#1
So one of the big issues in healthcare and science today has to do with the anti-vax movement, and more and more parents are electing not to vaccinate their children. This topic is fresh in my memory as it was a big one discussed in a bioethics course I took this spring. I have a feeling I know which way this is going to lean, which is why I'm prepared with sources for both sides. Debate away! <3
 

Whispered

Well-Known Member
#2
Yes, considering the concept of herd immunity applies not only to our vulnerable school-age children, but to the public as a whole. I support (obviously) medical exemptions due to allergies to components, weak immune systems that would not benefit from the vaccine, etc., but only on the certification of a MD.

By allowing people to be "conscientious objectors" to vaccines, you're not only causing your child to be susceptible to the illness, but you are also causing everyone else to be susceptible, as when a disease enters a population vaccines are not 100% effective. However, with herd immunity in play (80-90% for most diseases vaccinated), the rate of incidence and virtual effectiveness of the vaccine can be decreased to 0, and increased to 100% respectively.

Note: I voted "yes always" because I support medical exemptions but not religious exemptions, as I have not seen any valid example of a truly "religious" exemption to getting a vaccine, and even still I believe that the benefit far outweighs the small issue at hand. I further think that by permitting religious exemptions, you blur the line between someone who is simply a conscientious objector and someone with a truly held religious objection to the point that you must either ban both or ban neither (exemption, that is).
 

D.Va

Literal Princess
#3
Yes, considering the concept of herd immunity applies not only to our vulnerable school-age children, but to the public as a whole. I support (obviously) medical exemptions due to allergies to components, weak immune systems that would not benefit from the vaccine, etc., but only on the certification of a MD.

By allowing people to be "conscientious objectors" to vaccines, you're not only causing your child to be susceptible to the illness, but you are also causing everyone else to be susceptible, as when a disease enters a population vaccines are not 100% effective. However, with herd immunity in play (80-90% for most diseases vaccinated), the rate of incidence and virtual effectiveness of the vaccine can be decreased to 0, and increased to 100% respectively.

Note: I voted "yes always" because I support medical exemptions but not religious exemptions, as I have not seen any valid example of a truly "religious" exemption to getting a vaccine, and even still I believe that the benefit far outweighs the small issue at hand. I further think that by permitting religious exemptions, you blur the line between someone who is simply a conscientious objector and someone with a truly held religious objection to the point that you must either ban both or ban neither (exemption, that is).
I understand your side of the argument completely! Before the ethics course I mentioned, I was totally 100% in favor of vaccines being 100% mandatory. However, there is a bit of an issue because people do have a right to decide what they put inside of their (and their child's) bodies. However, I'm pretty sure if you asked the kid if they wanted to contract polio and become paralyzed, they would say no and ask to be given the vaccine. So while I'm supportive of vaccinations, I also respect everyone's right to decline.

THAT BEING SAID, if you don't want your child to be vaccinated, homeschool him/her. Don't put your kid in public school to bring a disease that could compromise children who cannot be vaccinated for health reasons.
 

Whispered

Well-Known Member
#4
I understand your side of the argument completely! Before the ethics course I mentioned, I was totally 100% in favor of vaccines being 100% mandatory. However, there is a bit of an issue because people do have a right to decide what they put inside of their (and their child's) bodies. However, I'm pretty sure if you asked the kid if they wanted to contract polio and become paralyzed, they would say no and ask to be given the vaccine. So while I'm supportive of vaccinations, I also respect everyone's right to decline.

THAT BEING SAID, if you don't want your child to be vaccinated, homeschool him/her. Don't put your kid in public school to bring a disease that could compromise children who cannot be vaccinated for health reasons.
if i +1 will you hate me because google plus is dead
 
#5
Yes. I don't understand why some parents won't vaccinate, but it is their child and totally up to them.
I believe it should be required to attend public school, yes.
If my son started school with a child who wasn't vaccinated...that child puts a risk to mine and any other student attending the school.
I believe vaccines help prevent illnesses that are slowly being brought back due to the fact parents are starting to vaccinate less and less.

And I agree, if you don't vaccinate, homeschool them.

EDIT: I also understand some children have health issues that would prevent them from vaccines.
I have an autoimmune disease meaning my body attacks itself instead of all the bad things in my body. So my immune system is weaker than others.
So some things my body could not tolerate if something in a syringe was a bit too strong for my body to handle. But I'd always consider getting anything that could help prevent certain things regardless if my body could handle it or not. I believe strongly in medicine and the benefits it provides.
 
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MissMorri

That Awkward Band Kid From High School
#7
I agree that we should require vaccines. One such example of why happened in my middle school. We had a mumps outbreak. It was particularly aggressive, and mutated so it was able to infect around 15% of people who DID have the vaccine. Ran rampant through the school, and caused a lot of controversy in the community, as many pro-vaccine parents (especially of those who got sick anyway) got mad. If it had been something worse, it could've been really bad. I voted yes, but with medical/religious excuse no. If the student's immune system can't handle it, so be it. I don't think the family should have to change their whole livelihood to homeschool or anything. However, I really can't think of a religious reason not to.
 

D.Va

Literal Princess
#8
I agree that we should require vaccines. One such example of why happened in my middle school. We had a mumps outbreak. It was particularly aggressive, and mutated so it was able to infect around 15% of people who DID have the vaccine. Ran rampant through the school, and caused a lot of controversy in the community, as many pro-vaccine parents (especially of those who got sick anyway) got mad. If it had been something worse, it could've been really bad. I voted yes, but with medical/religious excuse no. If the student's immune system can't handle it, so be it. I don't think the family should have to change their whole livelihood to homeschool or anything. However, I really can't think of a religious reason not to.
Some religions find vaccines to be unnatural and their relationship with their god can be damaged by vaccines. I know I'm not explaining that correctly but there are religions that prohibit vaccines.
 

MissMorri

That Awkward Band Kid From High School
#9
Some religions find vaccines to be unnatural and their relationship with their god can be damaged by vaccines. I know I'm not explaining that correctly but there are religions that prohibit vaccines.


Thanks! I didn't know that, but I could see why they would be against it in that case.
 
#10
I would say no to religious exemptions and yes to medical. There are anti-vax groups practically parents try to do illegal forging of documents. It's hard for me to have the choice for the parents as they don't have to suffer the consequences for their actions the child does. There are some things that parents think are good for their kids that will end up impairing them for their life.
 
#12
yes yes yes yes yes.

honestly this doesn't feel like a debate because it can be both ways, yes for medical(and school duh) and no for religion.
however, it would be more of a debate if you bring up let's say autism, as some parents believe vaccines do that (WHICH THEY DON'T) and will choose "no" and give that specific reason why they choose no. (if that makes sense?) no one cant really disagree between medical and religion but will disagree once disability is involved. now that's a debate (dumb but it happens ._.)

edit: no i don't want another debate post vaccines vs autism. just pointing out this doesn't feel like a debate, more of a conversation starter (OG thread).
 
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#13
There's a lot of different scenarios that I think are acceptable, but the bottom line is YES children should be immunized. However I am also pro-choice over what you do to your body; with that being said, IF the parents choose to not immunize their children, they should NOT place them in public schools or anywhere with a high population of children susceptible to the diseases.

If the child's family has a history of severely adverse reactions to vaccines, they shouldn't be forced to have them (but they still shouldn't put others at risk).

Vaccines do not cause autism. HOWEVER, I grew up with a family who had two sons- the first tested positive for a certain mutation that when presented with a vaccine could cause a disability (family had past health issues with vaccines). they chose to vaccinate him anyway, and he later was diagnosed with autism. Their second son also tested positive for the mutation, but did not receive the vaccine because of his brother's situation. He was in perfect health.

I wish I knew more details, but I've moved away and lost contact with them many years ago. There have been so many advances in medicine that I take this "story" as a grain of salt. This could've been a coincidence. Do I think vaccines cause autism? No. Could they if there is an abnormal gene in the sequence that becomes present when combined with a vaccine? Maybe.

Sorry for the chain of consciousness, but my opinion is hard to explain. Which is why I try to have a short answer of compromise: As a parent, you may choose to vaccinate your children or not; however, do not endanger the health of others if you choose the latter. But personally? Vaccines are a good thing. As bob barker says "Spay and Neuter your pets", I would say "Vaccinate your children"
 

Whispered

Well-Known Member
#14
@Elegance you are correct when you say that it's possible that abnormal genetics can cause autism when presented with certain chemicals. However, the genetics and biological processes behind this are so so so poorly understood that there is no way we can prevent this, nor really even know if a specific mutation will likely cause disease if expressed with a vaccine.

So although there's a tiny amount of science, you're also right that vaccines do not cause autism.
 

AlexanderH

Waiting for 2028
#18
I need an option that says special exemptions should be made for medical but not religious reasons. Viruses don't care about your religion.
This is the essence of why I didn't cast a vote. For the few people who shouldn't be vaccinated due to their abnormal physiology, that is no issue if everyone else who should be vaccinated is. It is our task to protect them, because there is no alternative.
 

Whispered

Well-Known Member
#19
I need an option that says special exemptions should be made for medical but not religious reasons. Viruses don't care about your religion.
i've looked into this and can't actually find any religion of any respectable size (read: over a couple thousand people) who actually advocates for not vaccinating.
 
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